Hang Up

Come on over
Said the tripper to the Gauth
Ul-Azam was the Gauth
Cotton Wool Dede
Master of Masters
I tell you Dede
From the divers near
Down in deep
I clocked all of you
To a place so fond
Where there even angels are allowed
Where even angels are allowed

Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia

And you are the Ahmad too
And you are The Jesus, The Moses
The Ahmad too
“Yeah.” says the Gauth
“True.” says the Hu
“Hang up
– Hang up the phone and come on over”

Down in deep
I clocked all of you
To a place so fond
Where there even angels are allowed
Where even angels are allowed

Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia

If the truth be told
What the tripper saw
His lesson was to meet
To withdraw the devils gun there
“You’ve been dragging yourself through a thorn bush with no clothes on –
– Through a thorn bush with no clothes on”

Hanging up the phone
Hanging up the phone
Hanging up the phone
Come over home

Hanging up the phone
Hanging up the phone
Hanging up the phone
Come over home

Hanging up the phone
Hanging up the phone
Hanging up the phone
Come over home

Hanging up the phone
Hanging up the phone
Hanging up the phone
Come over home

I tell you master
You!
Hang up
The phone

Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia

Hang up the phone
And come on over

Notes:
Ul-Azam (often referred to as Ghaus-Ul-Azam, or as Peter writes in these lyrics, Gauth-Ul-Azam) is a key figure in Sufism. Ul-Azam is viewed as a model Sufi – the kind of person all Sufis should strive to be like. He dedicated his early life to study and breaking the veil of nafs (basically, the lesser ego from the soul…meaning to devote oneself solely to God and no longer worry about wordly things and placing oneself above others…this is a pillar that Sufism is largely built on), becoming a “friend” of God at an early age (earning the title of Wali, though Gauth is another title that can also be used). It is believed that Ul-Azam had such a great knowledge of Islam that he revived Islam in its true form as it was first introduced by the Prophet Mohammad (following the Prophet’s death, Islam had become muddied by several schools of thought, with the true knowledge of the religion scattered, at best). It is further believed that Ul-Azam holds the same status among true Sufis and Saints as the Prophet Mohammad holds among the Prophets. Furthermore, it is believed that Ul-Azam has complete authority over Faqr (literally poverty…in Sufism, Faqr is a very key aspect to rise to and important in breaking the veil of nafs – Faqr literally refers to the independence of a person from all worldly possessions and acknowledgement of the need of only God) and that none may acquire Faqr and saintliness without his permission and approval.

Tripper literally means a “tourist.” In the Middle East, it is a cultural norm to invite people to their homes, even those they do not know. In this song, the tripper is inviting the Gauth (a Saint, basically, of God) to their home.

Dede refers to a socio-religious figure in the Alevi community. The Alevi is a branch of Islam that is based on Sufi elements of the Baktashi Order (a branch, so to speak, of Sufism). It is one of the two main branches of Islam followed in Turkey (the other being Sunni Islam, the most followed branch of Islam worldwide). To be a dede, one must be a descendant of Prophet Mohammad, operate as an educator and moral guide for the community, be knowledgeable and exemplary in character and manners, and to follow the principles written in the Buyruks (literally in Turkish meaning “adept,” this is a collection of spiritual books that contains many of the beliefs of the Alevis and the pillars the dedes must uphold) and established Alevi traditions.

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