Zikir

Vagrant held my master’s secret art
Oh, look at you

Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me, loves me not
Loves me

Notes:
A zikir, which translates from Arabic as remembrance, is a short phrase or prayer repeated over and over either silently or aloud. This is more common in Sufism than other branches of Islam, though it is present in various forms in Sunni and Shi’ite practices as well. Usually the names of God (99 in total) or du’a’s (prayers of supplication whereby a person asks God for favors) are recited. The intent is to remember the will of God (which is why many Muslims will say “insha’allah” after hoping for something in the future, meaning “God willing”). Specific to Sufism, zikirs often take place in a group ceremony. Depending on which order of Sufism a person follows, these ceremonies can range from group recitations of the zikir to musical affairs that involve costumes, incense, music, dance, and loss of control (in particular, the entering of a trance-like state). Here, the phrase “loves me, loves me not” is the subject of the zikir, being repeated over and over at the end until Peter’s voice fades away under the sound of the music.

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